Path to Peace by Angie Ransome-Jones

Path to Peace  by Angie Ransome-Jones
A Guide to Managing Life After Losing a Loved One


Death is difficult but inevitable. This book provides practical steps for preparing for the inevitable and coping after death – it should be on every bookshelf!


“Path to Peace, A Guide to Managing Life After Losing A Loved One,” chronicles one daughter’s journey of finding peace after the devastating loss of her father. In the midst of grieving, Angie Ransome-Jones was suddenly faced with laying her father to rest, settling his financial affairs and reconciling her unresolved feelings over the loss of her mother.

After learning what she refers to as “the process,” it’s now her mission to share practical steps to picking up the pieces and finding peace, after the loss of a loved one. In this book, Angie provides a comprehensive guide that yields advice from an attorney, financial advisor and grief counselor.

“Path to Peace” is one daughter’s story of reclaiming her life, realizing her purpose and finding inner peace along the way.



What People Are Saying About Path to Peace

Path to Peace is a wonderful book used as a source to go to time and time again if you are going through the process of grieving after losing someone. It is well researched and written, and is easy to absorb all while letting the reader take what they need at different times during the grieving process.

It does a comprehensive job of touching on the many types of loss, and offers helpful suggestions for coping and moving forward. From the moment I first started reading it, I knew the perspective is coming from well-informed person who has been through the grieving process.

I highly recommend buying it when you or someone you know is faced with the death of a loved one as it guides you forward with practical guides on what to do as well as emotional help. Give the book to someone you know who needs it. You will be able to help them when they need it most on their own time. By owning the book yourself, you will be able to understand and anticipate the needs of the people you care for who may need your help during a difficult time.  This is simply an amazing, well-written book that exceeded my expectations.


“This book is a compassionate and poignant reflection of the premise…everyone grieves differently. It is simply heart-warming!”
~Dionne Anglin, News Reporter, KDFW-TV 

This guide provides practical tools to manage the business affairs after losing a loved one.”
~Victor McGlothin, Essence Magazine Bestselling Author 

“What an incredible show of strength and courage in the middle of grief and loss…..Angie presents a very practical roadmap for all of us to follow!”
~Dr. Tracey Brown, Author/Speaker/Counselor Supervisor-Dallas ISD


Excerpt Chapter One


Until a year ago, I had always equated Election Day with colorful yard signs, cooler weather and National Angie Ransome-Jones Day, also known as my birthday. Now, I equate it to my Daddy’s passing. It was a normal day, just like any other for me. I ran my mouth with Evelyn while trying to get some semblance of work done at home. The day before, I worked an election with my good friend, Janis, like I had for the past few years and was trying to play catch up like I always do, whenever I take off from work. Coming off of a great weekend, I was on cloud 21!

Dad came down to celebrate my 44TH birthday and I basked in the possibilities of another year as Myles, my son, prepared for his first semester of college. There were so many things to be thankful for. Little did I know what was to come. If not every single day, it was at least every other day that I talked to Daddy. Usually, we had a typical 2-minute conversation. “Hey Daddy, what you doing?”

“Oh, nothing girl, just sitting here relaxing.”

Depending on whether I caught him half asleep or fully awake, the conversation could go one of a million ways. Mostly we would get off the phone immediately with a casual goodbye.

“Okay, just checking on ya. Daddy, go back to sleep.”

We often shared any number of long, drawn-out conversations on everything from gas prices to somebody on his job getting ill, or something pertaining to a distant relative I had no memory of. But on this particular day, something was different. Something was off. I tried calling him the night before while I was still at the election site, just before I knew he would be taking a nap to get ready for work at midnight. I tried again when I closed the polls about 10 or 11 p.m., on my way home, hoping to catch him fresh out the shower before he got dressed and jumped into his truck for work. Daddy had the same pattern every day. It usually started with him laying or piddling around all day until dusk, when it was time to prepare for his part-time “sleeping job” at the local bowling alley; the midnight shift. When I didn’t catch him, it wasn’t surprising. I knew for sure I’d catch him the next morning. After I failed to catch him for the umpteenth time, I did the one thing I dreaded most. Fearing a sharp reprimand, I called his job. Because I knew he hated his job and was just counting the days, even minutes, until re-retirement; I was doubtful he was still there. And, as it turned out, he wasn’t. 
Next, I did the second thing that I knew I would live to regret if he had merely overslept. I called his neighbor, Ms. Effie.  After knocking, peeking through windows, and calling his name repeatedly, Ms. Effie called back to tell me that she had no luck but thought he may have been home because she saw both cars in his garage. After what seemed like hours of Ms. Effie knocking, calling out my Dad’s name, “Al! Al!” and trying to calm me down hundreds of miles away, she decided to call for backup in the form of her daughter Erica; who I had also known for years. After a few more hours of knocking on windows, doors, and anything she could find, she called Dad’s phone repeatedly. Eventually, Erica heard his phone ring from inside the house. It was then, I knew he was gone. Daddy always carried his phone on his person, in either a pocket or on a chain attached to his hip.

The authorities wouldn’t tell me much except that he didn’t suffer. The room was left virtually undisturbed, which suggested there was not a struggle. Instead, they said he was sitting upright in a chair with his breathing machine by his bedside and appeared to have passed peacefully. He presumably had an asthma attack but the death certificate recorded it as “death by natural causes” and I’m okay with that. I had always imagined that I’d be there with him, like I was when my mother took her final breath but in this case, it wasn’t a part of God’s plan.

Step 1: Making the Call

Notification Process:
The first step and one of the most difficult of the ten I will outline, is the notification process. Instead of contacting our immediate family first, I notified people I knew would kick into full gear to do some of the heavier lifting that I was neither mentally nor emotionally prepared to do yet. I recommend appointing a “go-to-man” from the outset. You will need assistance in making dreadful phone calls while navigating through what will seem to be an endless list of people to notify; otherwise known as your “Call List.”

Handle with Care: In retrospect, after helping with the deaths of close friends, an important part of the process is to “Handle with Care.” This is important for those who meant the most to your loved one and would want to hear the news directly from you. I caused irreparable damage in my neglect of a relative that was near and dear to me, and my Dad, when he heard the news of his passing via word of mouth. Remember, word of mouth travels faster than the front page news.


( Continued... )

© 2015 All rights reserved. Book excerpt reprinted by permission of the author, Angie Ransome-Jones. Do not reproduce, copy or use without the author's written permission. This excerpt is used for promotional purposes only.


About the Author
Angie Ransome-Jones is a wife of 20+ years and mother of two young men, all currently residing in Texas. A banking Vice President and MBA, Angela has her own non-profit (501C-3) organization, Magnifying our Mothers (M.O.M.), which she founded in 2010, in memory of her mother, who lost her battle with cancer years earlier. In her spare time, Angela enjoys serving as a volunteer in her church and community, along with practicing and teaching yoga, and she is an active member of both Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated and Toastmasters International.  Wesite: http://www.path-2-peace.com


Purchase Path to Peace, A Guide to Managing Life After Losing a Loved One
https://www.amazon.com/Peace-Guide-Managing-After-Losing/dp/0991220919


“Path to Peace, A Guide to Managing Life After Losing A Loved One,” chronicles one daughter’s journey of finding peace after the devastating loss of her father. In the midst of grieving, Angie Ransome-Jones was suddenly faced with laying her father to rest, settling his financial affairs and reconciling her unresolved feelings over the loss of her mother.

Path to Peace author Angie Ransome-Jones talks about preparing for the inevitable on WFAA- Good Morning Texas. Watch the interview replay, go here.  Death is difficult but inevitable. Path to Peace provides practical steps for preparing for the inevitable and coping after death – it should be on every bookshelf!  
 
 

 
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